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A glossary (also known as a vocabulary, or clavis), an alphabetical list of terms in a particular domain of knowledge with the definitions for those terms. Traditionally, a glossary appears at the end of a book and includes terms within that book that are either newly introduced, uncommon, or specialized. While glossaries are most-commonly associated with non-fiction books, in some cases, fiction novels may come with a glossary for unfamiliar terms.

TermsEdit

The tour of our Solar System from A to Z.

  • Accretion: the process of growth or increase, typically by the gradual accumulation of additional layers or matter.
  • Accumulation: a mass or quantity of something that has gradually gathered or been acquired.
  • Air: the invisible gaseous substance surrounding the Earth, a mixture mainly of oxygen and nitrogen.
  • Asteroid: a space rock that is smaller than a planet and orbits the Sun.[1] See: Asteroid
  • Astronaut: a person who explores space.[1]
  • Atmosphere: the envelope of gases surrounding the Earth or another planet.
  • Atom: the basic unit of a chemical element.
  • Axis: an imaginary line about which a body rotates.
  • Bubble: a thin sphere of liquid enclosing air or another gas.
  • Canyon: a deep gorge, typically one with a river flowing through it.
  • Celsius: the scale of temperature in which water freezes at 0° and boils at 100° under standard conditions.
  • Climate: the weather conditions prevailing in an area in general or over a long period.
  • Cloud: a visible mass of condensed water vapor floating in the atmosphere, typically high above the ground.
  • Comet: a ball of ice with a tail made of dust and gas.[1] See: Comet
  • Condensation: water that collects as droplets on a cold surface when humid air is in contact with it.
  • Corona: the rarefied gaseous envelope of the Sun and other stars. The Sun's corona is normally visible only during a total solar eclipse when it is seen as an irregularly shaped pearly glow surrounding the darkened disk of the Moon. See: Eclipses
  • Crater: a large, bowl-shaped cavity in the ground or on the surface of a planet or the moon, typically one caused by an explosion or the impact of a meteorite or other celestial body.
  • Cyclone: a system of winds rotating inward to an area of low atmospheric pressure, with a counterclockwise (northern hemisphere) or clockwise (southern hemisphere) circulation; a depression.
  • Day: a period of twenty-four hours as a unit of time, reckoned from one midnight to the next, corresponding to a rotation of the Earth on its axis.
  • Dwarf planet: a celestial body resembling a small planet but lacking certain technical criteria that are required for it to be classed as such. See: Dwarf planet and category
  • Eclipse: an obscuring of the light from one celestial body by the passage of another between it and the observer or between it and its source of illumination. See: Eclipses
  • Element: each of more than one hundred substances that cannot be chemically interconverted or broken down into simpler substances and are primary constituents of matter. Each element is distinguished by its atomic number, i.e., the number of protons in the nuclei of its atoms.
  • Elliptical: (of speech or writing) using or involving ellipsis, esp. so as to be difficult to understand.
  • Energy: the strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity.
  • Equator: an imaginary line drawn around the Earth equally distant from both poles, dividing the Earth into northern and southern hemispheres and constituting the parallel of latitude 0°.
  • Erosion: the process of eroding or being eroded by wind, water, or other natural agents.
  • Evaporation: the process of becoming a vapor.
  • Fahrenheit: of or denoting a scale of temperature on which water freezes at 32° and boils at 212° under standard conditions.
  • Falling star: bits of rock and debris that fall to Earth from space.[1]
  • Flare: bursts of energy that flash from the Sun.[1] See: Solar prominences
  • Force: strength or energy as an attribute of physical action or movement.
  • Galaxy: a large group of stars and planets.[1] See: Galaxies
  • Gas: an airlike fluid substance which expands freely to fill any space available, irrespective of its quantity.
  • Gas giant: a large planet of relatively low density consisting predominantly of hydrogen and helium, such as Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, or Neptune. See category: Gas giant
  • Glacier: a slowly moving mass or river of ice formed by the accumulation and compaction of snow on mountains or near the poles.
  • Gravity: the force that attracts a body toward the center of the Earth, or toward any other physical body having mass. For most purposes Newton's laws of gravity apply, with minor modifications to take the general theory of relativity into account.
  • Greenhouse: a glass building in which plants are grown that need protection from cold weather.
  • Hemisphere: a half of the earth, usually as divided into northern and southern halves by the equator, or into western and eastern halves by an imaginary line passing through the poles.
  • Hurricane: a storm with a violent wind, in particular a tropical cyclone in the Caribbean.
  • Hydrogen: a chemical element with chemical symbol H and atomic number 1. With an atomic weight of 1.00794 u, hydrogen is the lightest element and its monatomic form (H) is the most abundant chemical substance, constituting roughly 75% of the Universe's baryonic mass. Non-remnant stars are mainly composed of hydrogen in its plasma state.[2]
  • Ice: a frozen mixture of fruit juice or flavored water and sugar.
  • Impact: the action of one object coming forcibly into contact with another.
  • Iron: Iron is a chemical element with the symbol Fe and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is the most common element forming the planet Earth as a whole, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core.[3]
  • Lake: a large body of water surrounded by land.
  • Life cycle: the series of changes in the life of an organism, including reproduction.
  • Liquid: having a consistency like that of water or oil, i.e., flowing freely but of constant volume.
  • Living thing: a living (or once living) entity.
  • Matter: physical substance in general, as distinct from mind and spirit; (in physics) that which occupies space and possesses rest mass, esp. as distinct from energy.
  • Meteoroid: a small body moving in the Solar System that would become a meteor if it entered the Earth's atmosphere. See: Meteoroid
  • Mixture: a substance made by mixing other substances together.
  • Molecule: a group of atoms bonded together, representing the smallest fundamental unit of a chemical compound that can take part in a chemical reaction.
  • Mountain: a large natural elevation of the Earth's surface rising abruptly from the surrounding level; a large steep hill.
  • Natural satellite: a celestial body that orbits another body, e.g. a planet, which is called its primary. See: Natural satellite
  • Nebula: a cloud of gas and dust in outer space, visible in the night sky either as an indistinct bright patch or as a dark silhouette against other luminous matter. See: Nebulae
  • Night: the period of darkness in each twenty-four hours; the time from sunset to sunrise.
  • Observatory: a building from which you can see planets, moons, and stars.[1]
  • Ocean: a very large expanse of sea, in particular, each of the main areas into which the sea is divided geographically.
  • Orbit: the path planets take around the Sun and moons take around the planets.[1]
  • Oxygen: Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table and is a highly reactive nonmetallic element and oxidizing agent that readily forms compounds with most elements.[4]
  • Photosphere: the luminous envelope of a star from which its light and heat radiate.
  • Planet: a celestial body moving in an elliptical orbit around a star. See: Planet
  • Planetary ring: A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in a flat disc-shaped region. The most notable planetary rings known in the Solar System are those around Saturn, but the other three gas giants of the Solar System (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) also possess ring systems of their own.[5]
  • Planetesimal: a minute planet; a body that could or did come together with many others under gravitation to form a planet.
  • Precipitation: the action or process of precipitating a substance from a solution.
  • Protoplanet: large planetary embryos that originate within protoplanetary discs and have undergone internal melting to produce differentiated interiors. They are believed to form out of kilometer-sized planetesimals that attract each other gravitationally and collide.
  • Quasar: a red object in space that resembles a star.[1] See: Quasars
  • Radar: a system used to find faraway objects.[1]
  • Rain: moisture condensed from the atmosphere that falls visibly in separate drops.
  • Revolution: the movement of an object in a circular or elliptical course around another or about an axis or center.
  • River: a large natural stream of water flowing in a channel to the sea, a lake, or another such stream.
  • Rocket: an elongated rocket-propelled missile or spacecraft.
  • Rotation: the action of rotating around an axis or center.
  • Rover: a vehicle like a car, used to explore the Moon and planets.[1]
  • Seepage: the slow escape of a liquid or gas through porous material or small holes.
  • Season: each of the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) marked by particular weather patterns and daylight hours, resulting from the Earth's changing position with regard to the Sun. See: Seasons
  • Spacecraft: a vehicle used for traveling in space.
  • Solid: a substance or object that is solid rather than liquid or fluid.
  • Spring: move or jump suddenly or rapidly upward or forward.
  • Star: a fixed luminous point in the night sky that is a large, remote incandescent body like the Sun. See: Stars
  • Streamflow: the flow of water in a stream or river.
  • Sublimation: a change directly from the solid to the gaseous state without becoming liquid.
  • Surface: the outside part or uppermost layer of something (often used when describing its texture, form, or extent).
  • Telescope: an instrument you can use to see the planets and stars.[1]
  • Temperature: the degree or intensity of heat present in a substance or object, esp. as expressed according to a comparative scale and shown by a thermometer or perceived by touch.
  • Terrestrial planet: a planet having a compact rocky surface like the Earth's; the four innermost planets in the solar system. See category: Rocky
  • Tilt: move or cause to move into a sloping position.
  • Tornado: a mobile, destructive vortex of violently rotating winds having the appearance of a funnel-shaped cloud and advancing beneath a large storm system.
  • Twinkle: the flickering light of a star.[1]
  • Universe: every planet, moon, and star in our galaxy and beyond.[1] See: Universe
  • Valley: a low area of land between hills or mountains, typically with a river or stream flowing through it.
  • Vapor: a substance diffused or suspended in the air, esp. one normally liquid or solid.
  • Volcano: a mountain or hill, typically conical, having a crater or vent through which lava, rock fragments, hot vapor, and gas are being or have been erupted from the Earth's crust.
  • Water: a colorless, transparent, odorless, tasteless liquid that forms the seas, lakes, rivers, and rain and is the basis of the fluids of living organisms. See: Water
  • Water cycle: the cycle of processes by which water circulates between the earth's oceans, atmosphere, and land, involving precipitation as rain and snow, drainage in streams and rivers, and return to the atmosphere by evaporation and transpiration. See: Water cycle
  • Weather: the state of the atmosphere at a place and time as regards heat, dryness, sunshine, wind, rain, etc..
  • Wind: the perceptible natural movement of the air, esp. in the form of a current of air blowing from a particular direction.
  • Year: the length of time it takes Earth to orbit around the Sun.[1]

ReferencesEdit

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